Thursday, December 31, 2015

Welcome to the 2015 Read 52 Books in 52 Week Challenge


Also the home of  Well Educated Mind, Around the World, A to Z, Dusty and Chunky  and various mini challenges.  

The rules are very simple and the goal is to read one book (at least) a week for 52 weeks.

  1. The challenge will run from January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015. 
  2. Our book weeks will begin on Sunday 
  3. Except for our first week which will run from Thursday Jan 1 through Saturday Jan 10
  4. Participants may join at any time.
  5. All books are acceptable except children books.**
  6. All forms of books are acceptable including e-books, audio books, etc.
  7. Re-reads are acceptable as long as they are read after January 1, 2015.
  8. Books may overlap other challenges.
  9. Create an entry post linking to this blog. 
  10. Come back and sign up with Mr. Linky in the "I'm participating post" below this post.
  11. You don't have a blog to participate.  Post your weekly book in the comments section of each weekly post.  
  12. Mr. Linky will be added to the bottom of the weekly post for you to link to reviews of your most current reads. 
All the mini challenges are optional. Mix it up anyway you like. The goal is to read 52 books. How you get there is up to you. 

**in reference to children books. If it is a child whose reading it and involved in the challenge, then that's okay.  If an adult is doing read aloud with kids, the book should be geared for the 9 - 12 age group and above and over 100 pages. If adult reading for own enjoyment, then a good rule of thumb to go by "is there some complexity to the story or is it too simple?"  If it's too simple, then doesn't count.  

Sunday, July 5, 2015

BW27: Jubilant July - Charming and enchanting






Welcome to Jubilant July and our theme of charming and enchanting plus our author flavor of the month - Tracy Chevalier.

What does charming and enchanting make you think of?  Southern Belles, Fairy tales, bewitching vixens, dashing alpha males, or mystical, magical tales or fantasy heroes.   We could go any route - whether it be cozy mysteries, retold fairy tales, southern gothics or historical fiction to name a few.  See what tickles your funny bone and enjoy following a few rabbit trails. 

One of which leads us to Tracy Chevalier  who is currently working on a retelling of Othello as well as organizing events and editing a short story anthology in honor to and in celebration of Charlotte Bronte's 200th birthday in 2016.  I think Chevalier is best know for her story The Girl with the Pearl Earring although she has written several novels including The Lady and the Unicorn and a story revolving around William Blake - Burning Bright.

Join me this month is reading all things charming and enchanting, plus I'll be diving into The Girl with the Pearl Earring. 


********************************************************************

History of the Medieval World - Chapter 31 Reunification pp 223 - 230

***********************************************************************
Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. 




Sunday, June 28, 2015

BW26: halfway there!



Can you believe we are halfway through the year already?  Amazing.  I am going to round out our Judicious June celebration with some legal non fiction. Once upon a time, I wanted to be a paralegal which lead to some interesting reading on ethics and law.  Heady stuff, always interesting to read, although a bit scary at times.  My studies lead me away from the legal field, however it taught to me always dig deeper and never forget to read the fine print.   Followed a few rabbit trails this week and discovered a few interesting non fiction books read by our chief justices and highlighted on the SCOTUS Blog book review.


Check out Ronald Collins book column on new and forthcoming books which is chock full of current and historical novels.
Nixon's Court

I've stumbled across quite a few fiction authors who were lawyers once upon a time and wrote about their experiences including Scott Turow on his first year in law school.




Then we have suggested reading lists for prospective and current law students which include the ever popular To Kill a Mockingbird along with Scott Turow's One L mentioned above as well as legal writing books, jurisprudence, historical and biographical.  Yes, your wishlists are going to just get bigger as you peruse these selections.  Have fun following a few rabbit trails.



***********************************************************

History of the Medieval World
 Chapter 30 The Heavenly Sovereign pp 215 - 222 

***********************************************************
Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url. 

Sunday, June 21, 2015

BW25: Summer is here!




Happy Summer!


Welcome to Summer and happy Father's day to all our dads.  I love Ella Fitzgerald and just had to share her rendition of Summertime.  Enjoy! 

Summer is a time to be lazy, rest and relax. Enjoy the beach, take a hike along the water or along a forest trail.  Maybe hit the road and explore or perhaps fly somewhere special with your special someones.  Or, we can just stay home and curl up with a good book or two or three.   I've had a couple weeks of my kid's summer lazies and already working up some summer lessons to keep us all from going crazy.  

So my task for you this week is to pick out one word that represents summer, get out your rusty, trusty thesaurus for a synonym and see if you can find a book in your stacks to match.  Have fun! 

*******************************************************************

History of the Medieval World - Chapter 29 Pestilence pp 203 - 214

********************************************************************
Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.

Sunday, June 14, 2015

BW24: Bookish Birthdays and what not!



It's been a while for bookish birthdays and book news, so here we go:

June 13:  William Butler Yeats - Irish poet and Dorothy L. Sayers - mystery novelist

June 14:  Harriet Beecher Stowe - best known for Uncle Tom's Cabin and John Bartlett - Editor and best known for his Bartlett Quotations

June 15:  Brian Jacques - Redwall series

June 16: John Howard Griffin - author of Black like me and Joyce Carol Oates - American Author

June 17:  Everhardus Johannes Potgieter - Dutch Poet and Henry Lawson - Australian Poet

June 18:  Chris Van Allsburg - children story writer and Phillip Barry -  best known for Philadelphia Story.

June 19:  Blaise Pascal - French philosopher and Thomas Buchan - Scottish Poet

June 20:  Vikram Seth - Indian novelist and  William Chestnut - African American Folklore



Flavorwire - 50 Essential Mystery Novels that Everyone Should Read

Addictive Books - Top 100 Thrillers of All Time

Worlds Best Detective and Murder Mystery Books

Mystery Novels from Around the World



Have fun following rabbit trails and adding to your wishlists! 

*******************************************************************

History of the Medieval World 
Chapter 28 Great and Holy Majesty pp 193 - 202 

********************************************************************
Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.



Sunday, June 7, 2015

BW23: Legal Thrillers by Brad Meltzer

The Tenth Justice


You know how they say a writer's first novel isn't always the best.  Whoever they are, aren't always right. I'm a huge fan of thrillers ones that get your heart pounding, fingernail nibbling, break out in cold sweats action type of stories.  From John Grishman to Lisa Scottoline to Jeffrey Deaver to Dan Brown (hush now) to Dean Koontz and all those in between.   A few years back I picked up Brad Meltzer's first novel The Tenth Justice and it totally blew me away.  I couldn't put it down. 


Synopsis:  Twenty-six-year-old Columbia Law grad Brad Meltzer makes a firecracker debut with a novel that will challenge your expectations of the legal thriller. With dialogue as true as it is sharp-witted, characters as likable as they are familiar, and a plot so addictive it will keep you reading into the night, The Tenth Justice is the one thriller you and your friends won’t be able to stop talking about this year—from an undeniably original writer you’ll be following for years to come.

Fresh from Yale Law, Ben Addison is a new clerk for one of the Supreme Court’s most respected justices. Along with his co-clerk, Lisa, Ben represents the best of the fledging legal community: sharp, perfectionistic, and painstakingly conscientious—but just as green. So when he inadvertently reveals the confidential outcome of an upcoming Court decision, and one of the parties to the case makes millions, Ben starts to sweat. Big time.

Ben confides in Lisa and turns to his D.C. housemates for help. They offer up their coveted insiders’ access—Nathan works at the State Department, Eric reports for a Washington daily, and Ober is an assistant to a leading senator—to help outsnake the blackmailer who holds Ben’s once-golden future hostage. But it’s not long before these inseparable pals discover how dangerous their misuse of power can be, even when accompanied by the very best of intentions. And when a suspicious leak develops from within their own circle, Ben and his friends find themselves pitted against each other in a battle of shifting alliances and fierce deceptions that strikes to the weaknesses in their friendships, threatens to ruin their careers—and ultimately may cost them their lives.


Which then lead me to The Millionaires


The Millionaires


It started as the perfect crime. Then it took a turn for the worse.

Charlie and Oliver Caruso are brothers who work at Greene & Greene, a private bank so exclusive you need two million dollars just to be a client. But when the door of success slams in their faces, they’re faced with an offer they can’t refuse: three million dollars in an abandoned account. No one knows it exists, and even better, it doesn’t belong to anyone.

It’s a foolproof crime. More importantly, for Charlie and Oliver, it’s a way out of debt and the key to a new life. All they have to do is take the money.

But when they do, they discover they’ve got a lot more on their hands than the prize. Before they can blink, a friend is dead—and the bank, the Secret Service, and a female private investigator are suddenly closing in. What invisible strings were attached to that account? How are they going to prove they’re innocent? And why is the Secret Service trying to kill them? Trapped in a breakneck race to stay alive, Charlie and Oliver are about to discover a secret that will test their trust and forever change their lives.


Which of course then lead to The Zero Game:

Zero Game



Matthew Mercer and Harris Sandler are playing a mysterious game. It’s a game almost no one knows about—not their friends, not their co-workers, and certainly not their bosses, who are some of the most powerful Senators and Congressmen on Capitol Hill.

It’s a game that has everything: risk, reward, mystery, and the thrill of knowing that—just by being invited to play—you’ve confirmed your status as a true power broker in Washington.

But as Matthew and Harris quickly discover, the Zero Game is hiding a secret so explosive, it will shake Washington to its core. And when one player turns up dead, a dedicated young staffer will find himself relying on a tough, idealistic seventeen-year-old Senate page to help keep him alive…as he plays the Zero Game to its heart-pounding end.

  So, if you love thrillers and books about law and lawyers and judges, be sure to check out Brad Meltzer. In addition to writing books (including nonfiction, children and comic books), he also hosts Lost History on H2 and Decoded on the History channel.


*************************************************************

History of the Medieval World
Chapter 26 - Invasion and Eruption pp 180 - 185 
Chapter 27 - The Americas pp 186 - 192 

*************************************************************

Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url. 



Sunday, May 31, 2015

BW22: Judicious June

Josephine Walls Libra


Welcome to Judicious June and our theme of all things prudent, perceptive and perspicacious and our author flavor of the month - Alexandre Dumas.

We are taking a total 180 away from the cunning and conniving of Machiavellian works to concentrate on the sharp and savvy, the bright and brainy, the clever and the crafty. The door is wide open open for courtroom and legal thrillers, mystery and detective novels, as well as historical and classic novels.

Which leads us to Alexandre Dumas. He is a french historian, author and playwright who is best known for his stories - Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers, and The Man in the Iron Mask as well as an assortment of other stories. Dumas was born on July 24, 1802, in Villers-Cotterêts, France, to Marie Louise Labouret and General Thomas-Alexandre Davy de la Pailleterie. His father was the first black general in Napoleon's army, nicknamed the 'black devil' by Bonaparte and his exploits are the basis for The Three Musketeers.


Join me in reading all things legal and thrilling and the works of Alexandre Dumas.


***************************************************** 

 History of the Medieval World 
 Chapter 25 Elected Kings pp 172 - 179 

****************************************************** 

Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.






Sunday, May 24, 2015

BW21: G.K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Happy Birthday to G.K. Chesterton, an English writer who was born on May 29, 1874 and died at the age of 62 on June 14, 1936. He has written many essays on democracy, religion, philosophy and religion as well as writing.  Today I'll leave you with his essay "The Ideal Detective Story " originally printed in Illustrated London News October 25, 1930


There has been some renewal of debate on the problem of the problem story; sometimes called the police novel, because it now consists chiefly of rather unjust depreciation of the police. I see that Father Ronald Knox has written a most interesting introduction to a collection of tales of the kind; and Mrs. Carolyn Wells, the author of an admirable mystery called “Vicky Van, ” has reissued a study on the subject. There is one aspect of the detective story which is almost inevitably left out in considering the detective stories. 

That tales of this type are generally slight, sensational, and in some ways superficial, I know better than most people, for I have written them myself. If I say there is in the abstract something quite different, which may be called the Ideal Detective Story, I do not mean that I can write it. I call it the Ideal Detective Story because I cannot write it. Anyhow, I do think that such a story, while it must be sensational, need not be superficial. In theory, though not commonly in practice, it is possible to write a subtle and creative novel, of deep philosophy and delicate psychology, and yet cast it in the form of a sensational shocker.

The detective story differs from every other story in this: that the reader is only happy if he feels a fool. At the end of more philosophic works he may wish to feel a philosopher. But the former view of himself may be more wholesome – and more correct. The sharp transition from ignorance may be good for humility. It is very largely a matter of the order in which things are mentioned, rather than of the nature of the things themselves. 

The essence of a mystery tale is that we are suddenly confronted with a truth which we have never suspected and yet can see to be true. There is no reason, in logic, why this truth should not be a profound and convincing one as much as a shallow and conventional one. There is no reason why the hero who turns out to be a villain, or the villain who turns out to be a hero, should not be a study in the living subtleties and complexities of human character, on a level with the first figures in human fiction. 

It is only an accident of the actual origin of these police novels that the interest of the inconsistency commonly goes no further than that of a demure governess being a poisoner, or a dull and colourless clerk painting the town red by cutting throats. There are inconsistencies in human nature of a much higher and more mysterious order, and there is really no reason why they should not be presented in the particular way that causes the shock of a detective tale. There is electric light as well as electric shocks, and even the shock may be the bolt of Jove. 

It is, as I have said, very largely a matter of the mere order of events. The side of the character that cannot be connected with the crime has to be presented first; the crime has to be presented next as something in complete contrast with it; and the psychological reconciliation of the two must come after that, in the place where the common or garden detective explains that he was led to the truth by the stump of a cigar left on the lawn or the spot of red ink on the blotting-pad in the boudoir. But there is nothing in the nature of things to prevent the explanation, when it does come, being as convincing to a psychologist as the other is to a policeman.

For instance, there are several very great novels in which characters behave with what might well be called a monstrous and terrible inconsistency. I will merely take two of them at random. By the end of the book we are successfully convinced that so very sympathetic a woman as Tess of the D’Urbervilles has committed a murder. By the end of the book we are (more or less) convinced that so very sympathetic a woman as Diana of the Crossways has betrayed a political secret. I say more or less, because in this latter case I confess to finding it, so far as I am concerned, an example of less. 

I do not understand what Diana Merion was doing in the TIMES office I do not understand what Meredith meant her to be doing; but I suppose Meredith understood. Anyhow, we may be certain that his reason was, if anything, too subtle, and not, as in the common sensational story, too simple. In any case, broadly speaking, we follow the careers of Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Diana of the Crossways until we admit that those characters have committed those crimes. 

There is no sort of reason why the story should not be told in the reverse order; in an order in which those crimes should first appear utterly inconsistent with those characters, and be made consistent by a description that should come at the end like a revelation. Somebody else might first be suspected of betraying the secret or slaying the man. I suppose nothing would have turned Hardy aside from hounding Tess to the gallows, though it might have been some gloomy comfort to him to have hanged somebody who had not murdered anybody.

But many of Meredith’s characters might have betrayed a secret. Only it seems possible that they might have told the secret in such an ingenious style of wit that it remained a secret after all. I know that there has been of late a rather mysterious neglect of Meredith, to balance what seems to me (I dare to confess) the rather exaggerated cult of Hardy. But, anyhow, there are older and more obvious examples than either of these two novelists.

There is Shakespeare, for instance: he has created two or three extremely amiable and sympathetic murderers. Only we can watch their amiability slowly and gently merging into murder. Othello is an affectionate husband who assassinates his wife out of sheer affection, so to speak. But as we know the story from the first, we can see the connection and accept the contradiction. But suppose the story opened with Desdemona found dead, Iago or Cassio suspected, and Othello the very last person likely to be suspected. 

In that case, “Othello” would be a detective story. But it might be a true detective story; that is, one consistent with the true character of the hero when he finally tells the truth. Hamlet, again, is a most lovable and even peaceable person as a rule, and we pardon the nervous and slightly irritable gesture which happens to have the result of sticking an old fool like a pig behind a curtain. 

But suppose the curtain rises on the corpse of Polonius, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern discuss the suspicion that has immediately fallen on the First Player, an immoral actor accustomed to killing people on the stage; while Horatio or some shrewd character suspects another crime of Claudius or the reckless and unscrupulous Laertes. Then “Hamlet” would be a shocker, and the guilt of Hamlet would be a shock. But it might be a shock of truth, and it is not only sex novels that are shocking. 

These Shakespearean characters would be none the less coherent and all of a piece because we brought the opposite ends of the character together and tied them into a knot. The story of Othello might be published with a lurid wrapper as “The Pillow Murder Case.” But it might still be the same case; a serious case and a convincing case. The death of Polonius might appear on the bookstalls as “The Vanishing Rat Mystery,” and be in form like an ordinary detective story. Yet it might be The Ideal Detective Story.

Nor need there be anything vulgar in the violent and abrupt transition that is the essential of such a tale. The inconsistencies of human nature are indeed terrible and heart-shaking things, to be named with the same note of crisis as the hour of death and the Day of Judgment. They are not all fine shades, but some of them very fearful shadows, made by the primal contrast of darkness and light. Both the crimes and the confessions can be as catastrophic as lightning. Indeed, The Ideal Detective Story might do some good if it brought men back to understand that the world is not all curves, but that there are some things that are as jagged as the lightning-flash or as straight as the sword.


******************************************************
 
History of the Medieval World - Chapter 24 Resentment pp 165 - 171

******************************************************

Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url. 




Sunday, May 17, 2015

BW20: Rabbit Trails

Josephine Wall's Ocean of Dreams

Josephine Wall's art always sends my imagination spiraling. Instead of doing the expected and highlighting all of Machiavelli's books such as The Prince or the Art of War, decided to follow a few rabbit trails this week.  His The Art of War leads to Sun Tzu who wrote The Art of War which leads to Forbes Sun Tzu's 31 Best Pieces of Leadership advice.  The Prince, of course, lead me to Antoine de Saint Exupery's The Little Prince.  I guess the story was supposed to be motivating but I found it extremely sad.  Has anyone read his other book Wind, Sand and Stars?   It's available for free for Kindle unlimited members.


This week we have  Honoré de Balzac and Sigurd Undset sharing the same birthday (may 20) as well as Dante and Alexander Pope (may 21).   Balzac honestly reminds of someone in The Princess Bride, I just can't put my finger on it.    Or maybe it was some other movie. Speaking of which, there are 17 films based on books hitting the big screen this year. The Moon and the Sun with Pierce Brosnan based on Vonda McIntyre's book which looks interesting as well as Victor Frankenstein from Igor's perspective and The Martian with Matt Damon based on Andy Weir's novel.  

You have to check out Project Vox which is working to revive or restore female voices which were left out of the 1700's philosophical canons.  They are highlighting Lady Masham, Margaret Cavendish and Anne Conway from England and Émilie Du Châtelet from France.

Have fun exploring rabbit trails! 

******************************************************************

History of the Medieval World - Chapter 23 Aspirations pp 159 - 164 

*******************************************************************
 Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.

Sunday, May 10, 2015

BW19: Happy Mother's Day

Are You My Mother? by P.D. Eastman

Happy Mother's Day, dear hearts.  One of my favorite memories is reading to my son when he was so much younger, books by P.D. Eastman and Dr. Seuss to name a few.   Now we're reading things like Inside Hitler's Bunker and the Iliad.  *grin* 

I really can't remember what books I read with my mother when I was a child.  Probably Dr. Seuss since I have a picture of me at 7 reading one of his books to my little brother.  I think the 50's / 60's generation probably all grew up on Dr. Seuss.   

What was your favorite book growing up?




In honor of my mother and mother in law and to everyone whose mother has passed.

My Mother My Angel

by

Kathy Parentau

Once upon a time an angel held my hand,
She wiped away my tears and helped me understand.
Our time on earth is brief, there's lessons to be learned,
Each precious day God gives us another page is turned.
Every chapter full of memories, times of joy and tears,
Triumphs and defeats, through every passing year.
She loved us unconditionally, always by our side,
When no one else would listen, in her we could confide.
With gentle words of wisdom she led us on our way,
Down the paths of righteousness if ever we did stray.
She saw the light in everyone and gave with no regrets,
Always from her heart let's not forget.
Angels come in many forms, for me it is my mother,
With love I cannot say in words there'll never be another.
Every day I turn the page in my heart will ever remain,
Everything she taught me as I stroll down memory lane.
Thank you God for giving me the most priceless of all treasures,
Help my Lord to keep alive her memory here forever.
I pray that I can some day be everything she hoped I would,
That's she smiling down from heaven knowing she did good.
As we gather here today there's no ending to her story,
Another chapter has begun full of grace and glory.
God's called her to his heavenly home, part of his great plan,
Although it may be hard, we all must understand.
Faith is what is hoped for, things we cannot see,
Heaven is promised to all of us if only we believe.



Hugs, love and kisses and have a wonderful Mother's day.


  **********************************************************

History of the Medieval World - Chapter 22 Byzantium pp 150 - 158

**********************************************************
Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url. 

Sunday, May 3, 2015

BW18: Machiavellian May

Niccolo Machiavelli
Welcome to Machiavellian May and our theme of all things cunning, conniving and calculating and our author flavors of the month - Dante Alighieri and Marcel Proust.

Yes, I know it seems like an odd mix however we are honoring Niccolo Machiavelli's who was born 546 years ago today; the 750 anniversary of Dante's birthday on May 21st; plus Marcel Proust is included  because I'm doing a readalong of Swann's Way with writing friends so dragging you all along for the ride. *grin*  

Let's define Machiavellian: 

  • of, like, or befitting Machiavelli. 
  • being or acting in accordance with the principles of government analyzed in Machiavelli's The Prince, in which political expediency is placed above morality and the use of craft and deceit to maintain the authority and carry out the policies of a ruler is described.
  • characterized by subtle or unscrupulous cunning, deception, expediency, or dishonesty
According to the 48 Laws of Power and the Machiavellian personality on Psych Forums:
Machiavellianism derives from the views of Prince Machiavelli that a ruler is not bound by traditional ethical norms. A prince, therefore, should only be concerned with power and
be bound only by rules that would lead to success.
Which basically leaves the door wide open to how you interpret it and what you choose to read: Historical or political thrillers, Shakespearean morality plays, or mysteries to name a few. 

I read Dante's Inferno last year and will be delving into Purgatorio this month. Several gals over on the Well Trained Mind boards who didn't read Inferno last year will be jumping into the first book, so join us in reading Dante. 

Marcel Proust has become a curiosity for me and after taking a short story class about him, will be also diving into Swann's Way, the first volume in his epic In Search of Lost Time.  If you are thinking I may have the 'eyes are bigger than her stomach' syndrome, you may be right.  
 “Every reader, as he reads, is actually the reader of himself. The writer's work is only a kind of optical instrument he provides the reader so he can discern what he might never have seen in himself without this book. The reader's recognition in himself of what the book says is the proof of the book's truth.”  ― Marcel Proust, Time Regained
**************************************************************************

History of the Midieval World:  Part Three -  New Powers
Chapter 21: The Ostrogoths pp 143 - 149

**************************************************************************
Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url. 


Sunday, April 26, 2015

BW17: Poem in Your Pocket




Poem in your Pocket was created by the New York Mayor's office in 2002 as part of National Poetry Month. In 2008 The Academy of American Poets spread the idea to become a worldwide activity, encouraging all to join in. April 30th is the official Poem in your Pocket day.  Carry a poem in your pocket and share it, or not.


Afternoon on the Hill 

by 

Edna St. Vincent Milay 



I will be the gladdest thing
Under the sun!
I will touch a hundred flowers
And not pick one.


I will look at cliffs and clouds
With quiet eyes,
Watch the wind bow down the grass,
And the grass rise.


And when lights begin to show
Up from the town,
I will mark which must be mine,
And then start down!


*********************************************************
History of the Medieval World - Chapter 20 
End of the Roman Myth:   pp 132 - 139
********************************************************* 

 Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.