Thursday, December 31, 2015

Welcome to the 2015 Read 52 Books in 52 Week Challenge


Also the home of  Well Educated Mind, Around the World, A to Z, Dusty and Chunky  and various mini challenges.  

The rules are very simple and the goal is to read one book (at least) a week for 52 weeks.

  1. The challenge will run from January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015. 
  2. Our book weeks will begin on Sunday 
  3. Except for our first week which will run from Thursday Jan 1 through Saturday Jan 10
  4. Participants may join at any time.
  5. All books are acceptable except children books.**
  6. All forms of books are acceptable including e-books, audio books, etc.
  7. Re-reads are acceptable as long as they are read after January 1, 2015.
  8. Books may overlap other challenges.
  9. Create an entry post linking to this blog. 
  10. Come back and sign up with Mr. Linky in the "I'm participating post" below this post.
  11. You don't have a blog to participate.  Post your weekly book in the comments section of each weekly post.  
  12. Mr. Linky will be added to the bottom of the weekly post for you to link to reviews of your most current reads. 
All the mini challenges are optional. Mix it up anyway you like. The goal is to read 52 books. How you get there is up to you. 

**in reference to children books. If it is a child whose reading it and involved in the challenge, then that's okay.  If an adult is doing read aloud with kids, the book should be geared for the 9 - 12 age group and above and over 100 pages. If adult reading for own enjoyment, then a good rule of thumb to go by "is there some complexity to the story or is it too simple?"  If it's too simple, then doesn't count.  

Sunday, April 26, 2015

BW17: Poem in Your Pocket




Poem in your Pocket was created by the New York Mayor's office in 2002 as part of National Poetry Month. In 2008 The Academy of American Poets spread the idea to become a worldwide activity, encouraging all to join in. April 30th is the official Poem in your Pocket day.  Carry a poem in your pocket and share it, or not.


Afternoon on the Hill 

by 

Edna St. Vincent Milay 



I will be the gladdest thing
Under the sun!
I will touch a hundred flowers
And not pick one.


I will look at cliffs and clouds
With quiet eyes,
Watch the wind bow down the grass,
And the grass rise.


And when lights begin to show
Up from the town,
I will mark which must be mine,
And then start down!


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History of the Medieval World - Chapter 20 
End of the Roman Myth:   pp 132 - 139
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 Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.

Sunday, April 19, 2015

BW16: Sonnets

Courtesy of BBC History
When I think of sonnets, my mind takes me right to William Shakespeare.

William Shakespeare was born April 25, 1564 and died April 23 1616 at the age of 52.  What can I say about the bard that most of us don't already know?  My late mother in law adored him and had memorized all his plays.  Numerous sites are dedicated to him and his works may be found online here, here, here and here to name a few. He wrote many sonnets which are a poetic form.  What exactly is a sonnet?  The word comes from the italian sonetto which means little song.

According to dictionary.com 
  
 a poem, properly expressive of a single, complete thought, idea, or sentiment, of 14 lines, usually in iambic pentameter, with rhymes arranged according to one of certain definite schemes, being in the strict or Italian form divided into a major group of 8 lines (the octave) followed by a minor group of 6 lines (the sestet), and in a common English form into 3 quatrains followed by a couplet.

The Shakespearean form is slightly different 

 Here, three quatrains and a couplet follow this rhyme scheme: abab, cdcd, efef, gg. The couplet plays a pivotal role, usually arriving in the form of a conclusion, amplification, or even refutation of the previous three stanzas, often creating an epiphanic quality to the end.

Poets of today used a modernized version of the sonnet and is only recognizable by its 14 lines and thematic qualities.  Check out this link with examples and links to various poets. Want to write a sonnet of your very own.  Check out How to Write a Sonnet offered by No Sweat Shakespeare or Sonnet Writer's instructions.

No, I won't challenge you to write a sonnet, however if you have a mind too, please share.


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History of the Medieval World - Chapter 19 The High Kings pp 125 -131 

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Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.







Sunday, April 12, 2015

BW15: Haiku for you



One of the most important traditional forms of Japanese poetry is the Haiku.  I fell in love with Haiku when my son and I read Grass Sandals: The Travels of Basho while doing Five in a Row.  So much fun to read and even more to write.  Although I'm not a poet, still find joy in putting together Haiku's which lead to exploring other forms.   Haiku seems simple enough.  Three lines of poetry with 5 syllables in the first line, 7 syllables in the second line and 5 syllables in the third line. They don't have to rhyme but traditionally should have a seasonal word to indicate the season. It doesn't necessarily have to be autumn, winter, spring or fall but a word that represents the season.  

Basho


Temple bells die out.
The fragrant blossoms remain.
A perfect evening!

or 

Masaoka Shiki

Night; and once again,
the while I wait for you, cold wind
turns into rain.
 



Check out Haiku for People which lists all the old masters plus samples of their poems.

My challenge to you this week is to write haiku.  Here's mine:



Morning glory blooms
Harkening Spring's coming soon
Purple majesty


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History of the Medieval World - Chapter 18 Orthodoxy (pp 120 - 124) 

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Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.

Sunday, April 5, 2015

BW14: April Alliteration




Welcome to April Alliteration and our author flavor of the month, C.S. Lewis.  April is National Poetry Month and there will be multiple events taking place over the month sponsored by the National Poetry Foundation.Check out their website for more information and different ways to celebrate the art of poetry.

Poetry can take many forms, from Acrostic to Sonnets to Ballads to Dirges to Free Verse to Odes to Couplets. A variety of rhythms and meter from Iambic to Alcaic to Blank Verse to Rhyme.  And the techniques are numerous from C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia Allegories to the Neologism of Lewis Carrol's Jabberwocky.

For the month of April, we'll be highlighting various poets and forms, as well as doing a readalong of C.S. Lewis Space Trilogy which includes Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra and That Hideous Strength.




C.S Lewis has written over 60 books about multiple subjects including literary history, literary criticism, theology, philosophy, biblical studies, sermons, essays, shorts stories, poetry as well as fantasy and science fiction.  He is best known for his Chronicles of Narnia which I read as a teen and again as an adult, getting different things out of them each time.  It's probably time for another reread, this time with my son and it will be interesting to see how he perceives them.  I also have Mere Christianity in my stacks.

Tyndale Seminary has created the C.S. Lewis Reading Room and made some of  C.S. Lewis's writing available online as well as the Online Books Page.


Join me this month is reading poetry, maybe trying your hand at creating your own poetry and reading C.S. Lewis.

 "Literature adds to reality, it does not simply describe it. It enriches the necessary competencies that daily life requires and provides; and in this respect, it irrigates the deserts that our lives have already become."  ~ C.S. Lewis

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History of the Medieval World - Chapter 17 Attila (pp 115 - 119)

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Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.

Sunday, March 29, 2015

BW13 - Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

On March 28, 1941, Virginia Woolf filled her coat pockets with rocks and walked into the River Ouse.  She had been battling depression for a very long time and decided to give up the fight. In a letter to her husband, she said:

I feel certain I am going mad again. I feel we can’t go through another of those terrible times. And I shan’t recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can’t concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don’t think two people could have been happier till this terrible disease came. I can’t fight any longer. I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work. And you will I know. You see I can’t even write this properly. I can’t read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that — everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can’t go on spoiling your life any longer.
Despite her battle with depression for much of her life, Woolf was a forward thinker and intellectual writer whose compelling stories were full of stream of consciousness and introspective writing.  Along with her novels, she published numerous short stories, essays and wrote powerful letters.  For more information on Woolf's life, check out The Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain. 

I currently have Mrs. Dalloway on my shelves and will be reading it this week in honor of Virginia Woolf.  Join me in reading her works this week.  All are available online here at The University of Adelaide.


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History of the Medieval World - The Huns  423 - 450 AD  (pp 106 - 114)

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 Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.




Sunday, March 22, 2015

BW12: Happy Spring!

Josephine Wall's Hope Springs Eternal


The year’s at the spring
And day’s at the morn;
Morning’s at seven;
The hillside’s dew-pearled;
The lark’s on the wing;
The snail’s on the thorn;
God’s in His heaven -
All’s right with the world!

~Robert Browning

Happy Spring! In keeping with our mystery theme this month, I looked up books with spring in the title and found several interesting mystery titles. 


 How about something hard boiled


Poodle Springs by Raymond Chandler


Or a bit British


G.M. Malleit's Pagan Spring


Maybe a psychological thrill

Clifford Irving's The Spring

Or gut wrenching suspense

Rick Riordan's Cold Springs

or a step back in time 

Charles O'Brien's Death in Saratoga Springs


Find something with Spring in the title to read this season. And no, you don't have to stick with mysteries.  *grin* 

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History of the Medieval World - Chapter 15 (pp 100 - 105)
Northern Ambitions (China 420 - 464 AD)

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Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.

 

Sunday, March 15, 2015

BW11: Cozy Mysteries



Cozy mysteries are so much fun to read. They usually involve a casual sleuth in a small town and a variety of settings (bookstore, museum, crafts shop, restaurant) as well as a variety of occupations (librarian, coffee house, reporter) with various side kicks including cats or maybe a dog or two or even a ghost.  The crime usually takes place off screen as well as any romantic interludes.  One  favorite cozy mystery author is Cleo Coyle with her Coffee House Mysteries as well as her Haunted Bookshop series. Check out her virtual coffeehouse full of coffee and muffin recipes.  Start with On What Grounds and she'll not only get you hooked on the story, but coffee recipes as well.  *grin*


Courtesy of Cleo Coyle


I also lean toward bookstore themed stories and have enjoyed Lorna Barrett's Booktown Mystery series starting with Murder is Binding.


 

Check out Cozy Mysteries Unlimited where you'll find every kind of cozy mystery possible.  


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History of the Medieval World 
 Chapter 13 (pp 91 - 94) - Seeking Homeland (410 - 418 AD)
 Chapter 14 (pp 95 - 99) - The Gupta Decline (415 - 480 AD)


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Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.

 

Sunday, March 8, 2015

BW10: Mystery Book Awards



I couldn't decide whether to go with international mysteries or non fiction mysteries this week so gave it up all and started perusing the mystery awards.  Who knew there were so many and such a wide variety of winners. Oh my poor aching wishlists.

Check out the best contemporary novel nominees for 2014 by the Agatha Awards (Winner to be determined in May.)

  °  The Good, the Bad, and the Emus by Donna Andrews 
  °  A Demon Summer by G.M. Malliet
  °  Designated Daughters by Margaret Maron
  °  The Long Way Home by Louise Penny
  °  Truth Be Told by Hank Phillippi Ryan


and the 2014  Edgar Awards nominees for Best Mystery novel to be presented by the Mystery Writers of America (Winner to be determined in April)

  °  This Dark Road to Mercy by Wiley Cash
  °  Wolf by Mo Hayder
  °  Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King
  °  The Final Silence by Stuart Neville
  °  Saints of the Shadow Bible by Ian Rankin
  °  Cop Town by Karin Slaughter 


Left Coast Crime mixes it up a bit by presenting the Lefty award for the most humorous mystery novel (Winner to be determined next week)

  °  The Good, the Bad, and the Emus by Donna Andrews 
  °  Herbie’s Game by Timothy Hallinan
  °  January Thaw by Jess Lourey
  °  Dying for a Dude by Cindy Sample
  °  Suede to Rest by Diane Vallere


Then we have the 2014 Macavity Awards named after the cat, Macavity in T.S. Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.


  *  Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger 
  °  Sandrine’s Case by Thomas H. Cook
  °  Dead Lions by Mick Herron 
  °  The Wicked Girls by Alex Marwood
  °  How the Light Gets In by Louise Penny 
  °  Standing in Another Man’s Grave by Ian Rankin



Thank you to Stop, Your Killing Me for providing all the links. Saved me some work.  *grin*

Now I have to go see what I can do to increase my book budget.  Happy exploring!

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History of the Medieval World - Chapter 12 (pp 85 - 90)
One Nature vs Two (408-431 Ad)

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Sunday, March 1, 2015

BW9: March Mystification

Courtesy of Teaching with a Mountain View


Welcome to March Mystification and our author flavors of the month are Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers and Josephine Tey.   All month long we'll be highlighting mysteries, both puzzling and perplexing, riddles to solve and mind boggling queries. Where dime novels, cozy mysteries, whodunits and police procedurals compete with hard boiled private eyes and super sleuths.  Pull out your magnifying glasses and binoculars and get ready to snoop. 

Agatha Christie created Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, Tommy and Tuppence as well as Ariadne Oliver, Harley Quin and Parkey Pyne.   I am more familiar with Poirot and Marple, than the other four, but will eventually make their acquaintance.  I haven't read anything yet by our other two authors.  Dorothy Sayers introduced readers to Lord Peter Wimsey and Josephine Tey brought us Inspector Alan Grant in her best known story The Daughter of Time as well as several others. 

Our fascination for mysteries started way back in the ancient Greece with Sophocles and Euripides who entertained folks with mystery and dramatic plays. Since then, we've fallen in like with classics mystery writers such as Edgar Allen Poe, Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, G.K. Chesterton and Ellory Queen, among others. But least we forget, there are numerous authors presently who make us fall in love with mysteries such as some of my favorites:   Nora Roberts, James Rollins, Sandra Brown, Lisa Scottoline, Cleo Coyle, Dan Brown, Jeffrey Deavers, Lee Child and John Sandford to name a few.  

Don't know where to start - check out Mystery Authors, Mystery Writers of America, and Cozy Mystery.  You'll be following rabbit trails for days.  *grin* 

Join me in reading all things mystery for the month of March.

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History of the Medieval World - Chapter 11 (Pp 77 - 84)
The Sack of Rome (396 - 410 AD)

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Sunday, February 22, 2015

BW8: Pick a book by the cover




Are you ready for a mini challenge?  Just realized I hadn't done any yet this year.   

Most of the time, when picking out a book at the bookstore or shopping online, I look for a familiar author or a book someone has recommended.   A few years back, a blogger friend of mine posed a challenge to pick a book based on its cover. The catch however was not to read the synopsis or reviews or anything else that would tell you what the book is about.  Pick the book, blog what you think the book is about, then read it and find out if your supposition was correct.  Easier said than done especially when you are as nosy as I am. The hard part is not  reading the excerpt on-line or if in the bookstore, reading a few pages here or there to see if it captures your attention. 

I've tried it a few times and have picked up some very interesting books using that method.  
This time, I went on Amazon and looked at  the new releases and chose books by authors I've never read, had an intriguing picture or title. I picked out some books after checking out the synopsis, but I resisted temptation and didn't read the excerpts or reviews. 

Euphoria by Lily King


Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro



Miramont's Ghost by Elizabeth Hall

Beautiful Redemption by Jamie McGuire
 
So which one do you think I should read?   I'll read the one that receives the most votes and let you know what I think of the story.   Join in the fun. Go the the library, bookstore or online and  pick a book based on its title or cover.

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History of the Medieval World - Chapter 10 (pp 72 - 76)
Cracked in Two (392 - 396 AD)

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Link to your most current read. Please link to your specific book review post and not your general blog link. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field leave a link to your specific post. If you have multiple reviews, then type in (multi) after your name and link to your general blog url.


Sunday, February 15, 2015

BW7: She Walks In Beauty

Lord Byron by Richard Westall 1813




She Walks In Beauty 

By 




She walks in beauty, like the night
   Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of dark and bright
   Meet in her aspect and her eyes;
Thus mellowed to that tender light
   Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,
   Had half impaired the nameless grace
Which waves in every raven tress,
   Or softly lightens o’er her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express,
   How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,
   So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,
The smiles that win, the tints that glow,
   But tell of days in goodness spent,
A mind at peace with all below,
   A heart whose love is innocent!

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 History of the Medieval World - Part Two - Fractures
Chapter 9 Excommunicated (Pp 63 - 71) 

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