Wednesday, December 30, 2020

2020 Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks

Welcome to the 2020 

Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks 

Challenge




Also home to 

Well Educated Mind, Agatha Christie, Mind Voyages, 
Sounds of Silence, Brit Trip perpetual challenges 
as well as 52 Books Bingo and Ladies of Fiction Bookology 





The rules are very simple 


  • The challenge will run from January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020 
  • Our book weeks will begin on Sunday
  • Week one will begin on Wednesday, January 1 and run through January 11. 
  • Participants may join at any time. 
  • All books are acceptable except children books.** 
  • All forms of books are acceptable including e-books, audio books, etc. 
  • Re-reads are acceptable as long as they are read after January 1, 2020
  • Books may overlap other challenges. 
  • If you have an blog, create an entry post linking to this blog. 
  • Sign up with Mr. Linky in the "I'm participating post" in the sidebar
  • If you don't have a blog or any social media account, post your weekly book in the comments section of each weekly post. 
  • Mr. Linky will be added to the bottom of the each weekly post for you to link to reviews of your reads. The link widget closes at the end of each book week



The goal is to read 52 books. How you get there is up to you. All the challenges are optional. Mix it up anyway you like. 



**in reference to children books. If a child is reading the book and involved in the challenge, then that's okay. If an adult is doing read aloud with kids, the book should be geared for the 9 - 12 age group and over 100 pages. If you are an adult reading for your own enjoyment, a good rule of thumb to use:  "is there some complexity to the story or is it too simple?" If it's too simple, then it doesn't count.

Sunday, April 5, 2020

BW14: Lord of the Rings - Fellowship of the Ring





This week we start our read of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring, the first book in the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

"In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven-smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and though he sought it throughout Middle-earth, it remained lost to him. After many ages it fell into the hands of Bilbo Baggins, as told in The Hobbit. In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose."

Take your time. Read it fast or slow, by yourself or aloud with your family. We have the whole quarter, April through June to read it.

Redditor Finds Rare 1st Edition Copy of The Fellowship of The Ring…in a Doritos Box

Owlcations discussion questions and perhaps try out the scone recipe.

Consider watching the movie or if you've already seen it, rewatch it with an eye to the differences with the book.

Gorge of the Rings: Eat your way through the book or movies.

George R.R. Martin talks about Lord of the Rings

Youtube audiobook narrated by Steven Garnett or listen to Audible's Rob Inglis

Happy Reading!

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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.





Sunday, March 29, 2020

BW13: Ladies of Fiction - Elizabeth Hunter



Welcome to April and National Poetry MonthNational Humor Month, International Guitar Month, and as well as Stress Awareness Month and Lawn and Garden Month.  What a great combination!  The first Wednesday in April is National Walking Day so grab your walking shoes and enjoy some fresh air.  Reading, music, humor, poetry, walking and gardening will help relax you mind, body, and soul. 

This month we celebrate our Ladies of Fiction with novelist Elizabeth Hunter who has written over 30 romance, contemporary fantasy, and paranormal mystery novels.   She resides in California and traveled extensively, researching world mythologies, history and the bonds of friendship, love, and family.  I discovered Hunter's books a few years ago when I read The Scribe in her Irin Chronicles series and was hooked.  I also have the Elemental Mysteries series as well as a couple books from the Elemental world books in my virtual stacks. I'm looking forward to reading her newest book, Suddenly Psychic, released February 16, 2020 and available on Kindle Unlimited.

There are a number of ways to complete the bookology challenge, including but not limited to:

Spell out the author's name - one book per letter from the title on the cover.
Read one or more books written by the author.
Read a book written in the country or time period of the author.

Learn more about Elizabeth through interviews with She Wolf Reads, with Susan Illene of Dark Fantasy, and Book Reader Chronicles.

We are also beginning our readalong of  J.R.R. Tolkein's Fellowship of the Rings for this quarter and I'll post more about it next week. 

Stay safe, be well, and happy reading!


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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.








Sunday, March 22, 2020

BW12: Happy Birthday Billy Collins







Marginalia
by



Sometimes the notes are ferocious,
skirmishes against the author
raging along the borders of every page
in tiny black script.
If I could just get my hands on you,
Kierkegaard, or Conor Cruise O'Brien,
they seem to say,
I would bolt the door and beat some logic into your head.

Other comments are more offhand, dismissive -
'Nonsense.' 'Please! ' 'HA! ! ' -
that kind of thing.
I remember once looking up from my reading,
my thumb as a bookmark,
trying to imagine what the person must look like
why wrote 'Don't be a ninny'
alongside a paragraph in The Life of Emily Dickinson.


Students are more modest
needing to leave only their splayed footprints
along the shore of the page.
One scrawls 'Metaphor' next to a stanza of Eliot's.
Another notes the presence of 'Irony'
fifty times outside the paragraphs of A Modest Proposal.

Or they are fans who cheer from the empty bleachers,
Hands cupped around their mouths.
'Absolutely,' they shout
to Duns Scotus and James Baldwin.
'Yes.' 'Bull's-eye.' 'My man! '
Check marks, asterisks, and exclamation points
rain down along the sidelines.

And if you have managed to graduate from college
without ever having written 'Man vs. Nature'
in a margin, perhaps now
is the time to take one step forward.

We have all seized the white perimeter as our own
and reached for a pen if only to show
we did not just laze in an armchair turning pages;
we pressed a thought into the wayside,
planted an impression along the verge.

Even Irish monks in their cold scriptoria
jotted along the borders of the Gospels
brief asides about the pains of copying,
a bird signing near their window,
or the sunlight that illuminated their page-
anonymous men catching a ride into the future
on a vessel more lasting than themselves.

And you have not read Joshua Reynolds,
they say, until you have read him
enwreathed with Blake's furious scribbling.

Yet the one I think of most often,
the one that dangles from me like a locket,
was written in the copy of Catcher in the Rye
I borrowed from the local library
one slow, hot summer.
I was just beginning high school then,
reading books on a davenport in my parents' living room,
and I cannot tell you
how vastly my loneliness was deepened,
how poignant and amplified the world before me seemed,
when I found on one page

A few greasy looking smears
and next to them, written in soft pencil-
by a beautiful girl, I could tell,
whom I would never meet-
'Pardon the egg salad stains, but I'm in love.'

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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.


Sunday, March 15, 2020

BW11: March Equinox





Welcome to my virtual parlor, dear hearts.  How is everyone doing?  We operate an audio repair shop which is constantly busy and we've been hearing all kinds of stories from our customers. A musician today said he's torn about whether he should cancel his latest gig or not as music brings happiness and keeps people from getting depressed. As it is a small venue, he says the people can practice social distancing.  

As Plato said: “Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything.”  

The same can be said about books too!  So this week we are celebrating the vernal equinox,  here in the Northern Hemisphere and the autumn equinox in the Southern Hemisphere.  Nature is in a state of glorious metamorphosis, a transition. 

While we all hibernate as best we can, your mission this week is to read a book about things to do with nature, both physical and spiritual, seasons, spring or autumn, or transitions and all the wonderful synonyms that go along such as upheaval, growth, conversions, flux, etc.   You may also consider reading a book with Spring or Autumn in the title or spelling out the word Spring and/or Autumn.

Spring reading: 10 book being adapted for tv/film.

44 Books To Read Over Spring Break If Your Travel Plans Are Canceled

100 must read books about nature.

Popular Nature Spirituality Books

Autumn reads

Authors with seasons in their names

Stay safe, be well and have fun following rabbit trails! 


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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.




Sunday, March 8, 2020

BW10: 52 Books Bingo - Creative




Bridge to Nowhere

by

Robin

On a bridge to Nowhere
To see No One,
Who could be Any one,
Who has traveled,
happy and safe,
everywhere and somewhere.
Music leads him
from near to far
across the bridge
to Nowhere.
The sky is full of light
sparkling and clear.
The air is full of love,
plenty and dear.
There, they sing and
dance and play,
Making up lines as they
have plenty to say.
Past the bridge that
leads to Nowhere,
They live to the rhythm
Of bass, cymbals, and drums
And maybe
A horn or flute or two.
Feet stamp, hands clap
And hips sway
To the beat
of the drum.
Who laughs, What sings
and Baby laughs with joy.
How do you do?
Welcome to Nowhere.


Let's get creative! Our next 52 Books Bingo category is creative which can be interpreted a number of ways. Granted the majority of books are the product of creative writing so you could just read any book.  However... What does it mean to be creative? What if you think you aren't a creative person, and are wondering how to be more creative. What can you do to inspire or improve upon your creativity?

There are books a plenty to inspire and nourish your creative soul, unleash your creativity or unleash your creative potential. You may want to get creative with Art, or read historical fiction about artists, main characters who are artists or about what makes a great artist tick.


Your creativity may lean towards being creative in the kitchen, decorating your house, landscape design or Arts and Crafts. Perhaps you enjoy Creative Writing, enjoy writing poetry or songs or comedy. You can also go off the beaten path with Popular creative literature books.

Have fun following rabbit trails or as Dr. Seuss would say:


“You’re off to Great Places! Today is your day! 
Your mountain is waiting, 
So… get on your way!” 

What would you like to create this week?


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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.

Sunday, March 1, 2020

BW9: Ladies of Fiction - Deborah Crombie



Welcome to March and National Women's History Month as well as Irish American Heritage Month, National Craft Month. and Paws to read Month. This week is Read an ebook week which shouldn't be to hard for any us. *grin* It is also Will Eisner's Week in celebration of his legacy, comic books, graphic novels and free speech.

This month we celebrate our Ladies of Fiction with mystery novelist Deborah Crombie who wrote the 18 book series about Duncan Kincaid/Gemma James mysteries set in England. Crombie currently resides in Texas, but still visits England frequently. She previously lived in Chester, England, and Edinburgh, Scotland. Her first novel, A Share of Death, was inspired by a past visit to Yorkshire and homesickness for England. Happy to hear she is currently working on the 19th book.

I previously read Sound of Broken Glass, #15 in the series, totally out of order (silly me,) so wasn't familiar with the characters. However, I enjoyed the story and it made me want to read the whole series, which really should be read in order as the story follows the progression of the characters lives.

There are a number of ways to complete the bookology challenge, including but not limited to:

Spell out the author's name - one book per letter from the title on the cover.
Read one or more books written by the author.
Read a book written in the country or time period of the author.

Learn more about Deborah Crombie through a Q & A with Louise Penny , In conversation with Barbara Peters, owner of Poisoned Pen Bookstore, and Author Stories Podcast


Which brings me to the question of the week:  What do you like about mystery stories and who are your favorite mystery writers?  

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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.


In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.




Sunday, February 23, 2020

BW8: 52 Books Bingo - Four Seasons and Four legged animals

Available at Victoria's Moon. 
The lyrics running through my head today are from James Taylor's You Got a Friend. Why is it that I can't ever remember the whole song but just a snippet which turns into a ear worm for the the day.



Winter, spring, summer or fall
All you've got to do is call
And I'll be there, ye, ye, ye
You've got a friend

Does anyone else wake up to music playing in their head in the morning? No? Just me. Hmm.... Which leads to our Bingo categories for the week: Four seasons and/or four legged animals.

How many ways can we go with four seasons?

Read a book with Four Seasons in the title
Read a book with one or more of the Seasons in the title
Read a book which experiences nature's four seasons during the telling of the tale.
Read a book about the four seasons.
Read a book in which someone goes through four seasons in their life such as aging or trials.
Read a book about four seasons of marriage.

Explore the symbolism of the four seasons, examples of seasonal symbolism, or Literature connections to Real Reasons for Seasons.

For four legged animals, otherwise known as quadrupeds, we can go a variety of ways with real life four legged creatures such as horses, dogs, cats, lions, elephants, sheep, etc or the mythical or fictional variety about  dragons, griffins, unicorns, werewolves and other were creatures.


Let your imagination be your guide and have fun following rabbit trails.

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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.


Sunday, February 16, 2020

BW7: Sunrise on the Coast - Banjo Paterson



Sunrise on the Coast

   by 


Grey dawn on the sand-hills–the night wind has drifted
    All night from the rollers a scent of the sea;
With the dawn the grey fog his battalions has lifted,
    At the call of the morning they scatter and flee.

Like mariners calling the roll of their number
    The sea-fowl put out to the infinite deep.
And far over-head–sinking softly to slumber–
    Worn out by their watching, the stars fall asleep.

To eastward, where resteth the dome of the skies on
    The sea-line, stirs softly the curtain of night;
And far from behind the enshrouded horizon
    Comes the voice of a God saying “Let there be light.”

And lo, there is light!      Evanescent and tender,
    It glows ruby-red where ’twas now ashen-grey;
And purple and scarlet and gold in its splendour–
    Behold, ’tis that marvel, the birth of a day!

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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

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Sunday, February 9, 2020

BW6: 52 Books Bingo - Whimsical and Humorous





All you need is love. La la la la la. I have The Beatles song "All You need is Love" stuck in my head today.


There's nothing you can do that can't be done
Nothing you can sing that can't be sung
Nothing you can say but you can learn how to play the game
It's easy

Nothing you can make that can't be made
No one you can save that can't be saved
Nothing you can do but you can learn how to be you in time
It's easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

I think it's because Valentine's day is coming up and love is in the air so love the one you're with. Dang, now I've got Stephen Stills rocking in my head. How about hug the one you're with because everyone needs a hug today. When ever you need a bit of whimsy, just watch the Beatles movie, The Yellow Submarine and it'll cheer you right up.

Which brings us to our next two 52 Books Bingo categories: Whimsical and Humorous. They could be one and the same although whimsy always strikes me as something light and fanciful, magical, or playful while humorous is comedic and makes me laugh. How do you define whimsy?

NPR's We Did It For The LOLs: 100 Favorite Funny Books

Lit Hub's 20 Very Funny Novels By Women

Barnes and Nobles Reads 50 of the Funniest Books Ever Written.

Explore Buzzfeed's collection of eclectic choices for whimsical magical reads: 19 Books That Will Make Your Life A Little More Magical or B & N's selection of Whimsical Women Sleuths.

Also Goodread's Popular Whimsical books and Popular Magical Whimsical Books and Popular Fanciful Books. Plus check out Book Inc's Wit and Whimsy book club for the youngsters.

Your mission this week is to pick out a story that makes you laugh or provides you with the power of whimsy. Happy reading!!!



Happy Valentine's Day
Hugs and love to you all! 

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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

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Sunday, February 2, 2020

BW5: Ladies of Fiction - Mary Stewart



It's February!!! Happy Ground Hog's day! Will Punxsutawney Phil see his shadow today? I think not as it's acting like spring around here and the flowers are quite confused. This month is Black History Month, American Heart Month, Great American Pie Month as well as Spunky Old Broads Month.   I need to read Gayle Carson's How to Be an S.O.B.—A Spunky Old Broad Who Kicks Butt and how to be spunky, open, and brave. *grin*

I think this month's Ladies of Fiction Bookology author, Mary Stewart would have been considered spunky, open, and brave. She wrote mysteries, romantic suspense novels, an Arthurian fantasy series, short stories, children's books, radio plays and poetry. 


I first read the Arthurian saga about Merlin and his life before, during, and after King Arthur, which consisted of The Crystal Cave (1970), The Hollow Hills (1973), and The Last Enchantment (1979) and Wicked Day (1983) back during the late 70's, early 80's.  I read and reread all her books during that period of time, but unfortunately only kept Merlin's Series in my stacks.   The series has always stood the test of time and each time I get something new out of them.  I look forward to rereading The Crystal Cave again this month. 


I only have to hear one of the titles of her books such as Touch Not the Cat or Nine Coaches Waiting or The Ivy Tree or Airs above the Ground and be taken right back into the story.   


There are a number of ways to complete the bookology challenge, including but not limited to:

  • Spell out the author's name - one book per letter from the title on the cover.
  • Read one or more books written by the author.
  • Read a book written in the country or time period of the author.
Learn more about Mary Stewart and watch her discuss her passion for reading and writing, Camelot Project's Interview and Mystery Scene's article: Mary Stewart, Teller of Tales


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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.


In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.





Sunday, January 26, 2020

BW4: The Wind was on the Withered Heath





"They sat long at the table with their wooden drinking bowls filled with mead. The dark night came on outside. The fires in the middle of the hall were built with fresh logs and the torches were put out, and still they sat in the light of the dancing flames with the pillars of the house standing tall behind them, and dark at the top like trees in the forest.  Whether it was magic or not, it seemed to Bilbo that he heard a sound like wind in the branches stirring in the rafters, and the hoot of owls.  Soon he began to nod with sleep and the voices seemed to grow far away, until he woke with a start.

The great door had creaked and slammed. Beorn was gone. The dwarves were sitting cross legged on the floor round the fire, and presently they began to sing.  Some of the verses were like this, but there were many more, and their singing went on for a long while: 




The wind was on the withered heath,
but in the forest stirred no leaf:
there shadows lay by night and day,
and dark things silent crept beneath.

The wind came down from mountains cold,
and like a tide it roared and rolled;
the branches groaned, the forest moaned,
and leaves were laid upon the mould.

The wind went on from West to East;
all movement in the forest ceased,
but shrill and harsh across the marsh
its whistling voices were released.

The grasses hissed, their tassels bent,
the reeds were rattling—on it went
o'er shaken pool under heavens cool
where racing clouds were torn and rent.

It passed the lonely Mountain bare
and swept above the dragon's lair:
there black and dark lay boulders stark
and flying smoke was in the air.

It left the world and took its flight
over the wide seas of the night.
The moon set sail upon the gale,
and stars were fanned to leaping light."

The Hobbit:  Queer Lodgings

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Please share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.