Sunday, November 11, 2018

BW46: Armistice Day







The Soldier

by


If I should die, think only this of me:
That there’s some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam;
A body of England’s, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.

In honor of  all those who fought in World War I, read the poignant poetry of soldiers and volunteers who served.

The First World War Poetry Digital Archive

Pan Macmillan's The Poetry of the First World War

Poetry Foundation's Poetry of World War I

Poet Luke Wright pens tribute to World War One soldiers and more from BBC

Brit Tripping 

Our Brit Trip is taking us down Watling Way to Shropshire. Shropshire is one of the most rural and sparsely populated counties in England and is well known for its hills and other natural landmarks.

Rabbit trails: Caedfael Virtual Tour Barbara Pym Wilfred Owen Edith Pargeter (aka Ellis Peters)


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Sunday, November 4, 2018

BW45: Welcome to Nonfiction November

Courtesy of Libraryskills.com

Welcome to Nonfiction November. This month we are jumping into the world of nonfiction which encompasses a wide variety of categories including but not limited to -  memoirs and essays, history and geography, comedy and cookbooks and crafts, language and technology, religion and philosophy, music and art, to law and political science, self help and travel, to writing and reference books.   

Nonfiction is no longer full of dry facts and figures and has expanded quite a bit over the years with the advent of literary or creative nonfiction essay writing which uses the literary styles and techniques of fiction to tell a factual story. 

There are a wide variety of writing books that teach the art of creative nonfiction which includes Dinty Moore's Crafting the Personal Essay and Flash Nonfiction, Peter Turchi's Maps of the Imagination, Jack Hart's A Writer's Coach, and  A Nonfiction Writers' Guide from the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University Telling True Stories.   There are plenty of entertaining, well written creative nonfiction stories such from  Joan Didion's Slouching towards Bethlehem, to Annie Dillard's The Writing Life and Anne Lamont's Bird by Bird.  Can you tell I have writing on my brain today? *grin*  

Take a look at Goodread's long list of Popular Creative Nonfiction reads and check out the variety of authors from Truman Capote, Barbara Kingsolver,  Maya Angelou to John Berendt, Frank McCourt, Neil Gaiman, and John Muir.  Take a look at Esquire's picks of the 40 Best Nonfiction Books in 2018 so far, as well as 25 Best True Crime books, plus Barnes and Nobles 50 Nonfiction Books that will make you Smarter in 2018.


Flower of the month

Our Blossom Bookology flower of the month is the Daisy.  There are a number of directions to go for this month's challenge. Read one book per letter using either the title and/or the first or last name of the author. Yes, you can mix it up. You may read a book with the name of the flower, color of the flower in the title, or on the cover. Another possibility is a book which takes place in the time period or flower's country of origin or has some cultural significance and/or symbolism of the flower. The choices are unlimited.



Brit Tripping

Our Brit Trip is taking us down Watling Way to Staffordshire. 

Staffordshire has a history of being a significant pottery center for centuries.



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Link to your reviews. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post. If you don't have a blog, leave a comment telling us what you have been reading.