Sunday, December 22, 2019

2019 Year End Reading Wrap Up




“She read books as one would breathe air, to fill up and live.” ~ Annie Dillard


Happy Solstice!  Join me for a cup of tea, a glass of wine or your favorite beverage as we reflect on our 52 Books rambling reading adventures the past year. Can you believe we are not only winding up 2019, but the end of a decade. We have traveled around the world and the universe. We wandered the deep blue sea and climbed the highest mountains and even explored the limitlessness of outer space. Our armchair travels have taken us through different time periods, through fictional, magical and historical journeys along with pioneers and astronauts, historians and time travelers, villains and sleuths. Ah books! The spice of life! 


Tell us about your reading year? What was your goal this year and did you have a plan, and/or follow rabbit trails or wing it?

Where did your armchair travels take you? Which books stood out, made an impression and/or stayed with you the longest? What did you learn from them?

Which book had the most original, most unique story?  


Which book made you laugh? Which one made you cry?

Which book did you like the least and why?

Which new to you authors did you discover and would you read another book by this author?

Did you try any of the main or mini challenges? If so, which Bingo category did you like the most and the least and what did you read? Which authors and/or detectives would you like to continue exploring from Whodunit Bookology.

Please share your book lists, stats for the year, favorite quotes, and/or favorite book covers.

Congratulations to all our readers and those who followed our progress. Neil Gaiman once said "Read. Read anything. Read the things they say are good for you, and the things they claim are junk. You’ll find what you need to find. Just read.” Whether you read fast or slow, listen to audio books; read fluffy, light romances or heavy classics, comedy to drama, urban fantasies to thrillers, or nonfiction to comics, the most essential thing is reading.



I appreciate each and every one of you and hope you had fun along the way. I have enjoyed sharing our reading journey and look forward to more bookish adventures. Many wishes for a happy Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Jolabokaflod, Christmas or Festivus to you all and cheers to a happy, enlightening, and inspiring reading new year!

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Link to your reviews and/or year end wrap up. In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book or wrap up in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter. If you don't have a blog, leave a comment telling us what you have been reading.






Saturday, December 21, 2019

2020 Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks




“A book, too, can be a star, a living fire to lighten the darkness, 
leading out into the expanding universe.” Madeleine L’Engle


Are you ready for another Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks adventure?  The goal is quite simple and how you get there is up to you.  Where would you like your bookish travels to take you this year?  What are you in the mood for?  I'm in the mood for a something mindful or mysterious or magical, mayhap even mind boggling or masterful, even a bit mundane.  How about you?   Whether you read fiction or nonfiction, like to explore outside your comfort zone with new to you authors or genres,  or love to read the same books over again or stick to the tried and true, then this is the place for you.  

There are two updated challenges to tease your reading palate:  2020 52 Books Bingo with 20 bonus squares to celebrate the beginning of a new decade, and Ladies of Fiction Bookology, our author of the month and spelling challenge.  

We also have a variety of weekly, monthly mini challenges and perpetual challenges  including: 

Well Educated Mind --  Continue to explore the classics in 6 categories: Fiction, Autobiography, History/Politics, Drama, Poetry and Science. 

Agatha Christie  --  read at least three of her books per year.  Read the books in chronological order as listed, group by detective or collection, or randomly if you choose. 

Brit Tripping --- A year long mystery read traveling the Roman Roads through England reading reading a book from each of the 45 counties with a few extra trips to London. 

Plus Sounds of Silence, Mind Voyages, A to Z, Dusty and Chunky, and Feed Your Muse

The mini and perpetual challenges are all optional, Mix them up anyway you like or follow your own path in the quest to read.  


  • The challenge will run from January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020 
  • Our book weeks begin on Sunday
  • Week one begins Wednesday, January 1 and run through January 11. 
  • Participants may join at any time. 
  • All books are acceptable except children books.** 
  • All forms of books are acceptable including e-books, audio books, etc. 
  • Re-reads are acceptable as long as they are read after January 1, 2020
  • Books may overlap other challenges. 
  • If you have an blog, create an entry post linking to this blog. 
  • Sign up in the "I'm participating post" in the sidebar
  • If you don't have a blog or social media account, post about your reads in the comments section of each weekly post. 
  • The link widget will be added to the bottom of each weekly post for you to link to reviews of your reads. The link widget closes at the end of each book week. 



Sunday, December 15, 2019

BW51: Happy Birthday Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C. Clarke - Courtesy of the Telegraph


December 16th is the anniversary of the birthday of Arthur C. Clarke who passed away at the age of 90 on March 19, 2008.

When I think of Arthur C. Clarke, generally the first thing that comes to mind is 2001: A Space Odyssey. He also co-created the film with Stanley Kubrick.  He went on to write 2010: Odyssey Two, 2061: Odyssey Three and 3001: The Final Odyssey as well as numerous other books.

Surprisingly, Clarke never received any awards for the novel 2001: a Space Odyssey, but the movie received a Hugo Award in 1969 for Best Dramatic Presentation in a theatrical version. Clarke did receive the Hugo award for Foundations of Paradise in 1980 and Rendezvous with Rama in 1974. He was nominated for a Hugo for 2010: A Space Odyssey in 1982 and A Fall of Moondust in 1963.

Clarke loved science and built his very first telescope at the age of 13. In 1945 he wrote a technical paper "Extra Terrestrial Relays" in which he wrote the principles for satellite communications which led to the global satellites systems we use today. In 1949 he became Chairman of the British Interplanetary Society. 


According to the Clarke Foundation:

"Clarke's work, which led to the global satellite systems in use today, brought him numerous honors including the 1982 Marconi International Fellowship, a gold medal of the Franklin Institute, the Vikram Sarabhai Professorship of the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, the Lindbergh Award and a Fellowship of King's College, London. Today, the geostationary orbit at 36,000 kilometers above the equator is named The Clarke Orbit by the International Astronomical Union."

Clarke wrote a number of interesting non fiction books about exploring space and the sea including Interplanetary Flight (1950) about rockets, orbital mechanics and space, Exploration of Space (1951) About the possibilities of space exploration, Exploration of the Moon (1954) and the possibilities of future space travel and Young travelers in Space (1954) History of rocket development and satellite launches. He also spent years exploring the great barrier reef and wrote several books about underwater exploration: The Coast of Coral (1956) about his adventures and mishaps which exploring the great barrier reef, Boy Beneath the Sea (1958), and The Challenge of the Sea (1960) about deep sea exploration and the future.

Arthur Clarke made many predictions over the years and seven have come true

He also came up with the "Three Laws" of prediction:
  • When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
  • The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.
  • Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
What do you think of his Three Laws?




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Share your book reviews and link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have a social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.


Saturday, December 14, 2019

I'm participating in 2020



2020 Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks


Welcome to our annual Read 52 Books in 52 Week Reading Adventure.  In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of your blog (if you have one). In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter. Please introduce yourself in the comments and include your name and your tentative reading plans for the year. Please share if you have a Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page and leave the url address in the comments as well.









Sunday, December 8, 2019

BW50: 52 Books Bingo -- Nature and Allegory





I'm currently working on the categories for our 2020 52 Books Bingo and having fun coming up with new and different categories to amuse your reading palates. As we wind down the year, our last two categories are Nature and Allegory. Nature may be literal or symbolic which pairs up quite nicely with allegory, a narrative that take an abstract look at characters and events.

Bookriot: 50 Must-Read Books On Nature and Science.

Bookauthority: 76 best nature books of all time.

Chicago Review of Books: The Best Nature Books of 2019, Part 2

Goodreads: Best Nature Books and Popular Human Nature Books and Allegorical Socialism and Communism in Fiction

Sandra Neily's The Beauty and Value of Nature-Based Fiction

19 children's books you need to re-read as an adult

Have fun following rabbit trails!

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Share your book reviews and link link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have any internet or social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. Please do not add links of 52 Books, nonexistent or old web pages. They will be deleted. If your link disappears, please email me if you need to change or update your links. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.



Sunday, December 1, 2019

BW49: Whodunit Bookology - Gabriel Allon




Our whodunit bookology detective for December is Gabriel Allon, created by Daniel Silva. The character is a former Israeli intelligence operative, who retired and became an art restorer but gets pulled out of retirement to catch a terrorist.

There are a variety of ways to complete this challenge with plenty of rabbit trails. Read a book with one or more of the following (but not limited too) and have fun exploring a variety of places and topics:



  • One book per letter in the character's first or last name.
  • One book per letter in the author's first or last name.
  • If you're feeling really ambitious, one book per letter in the character's first and last name.
  • Follow in the character's footsteps and read a book set in the country or time frame of the story.
  • Follow in the author's footsteps and read a book set in their place or time of birth.
  • Read a book with the first or last name of the character or author in the title.
  • Read the first book in the series.

Daniel Silva's 19th book in the Gabriel Allon series, The New Girl, was released in July 2019. Learn more about the author and his thoughts on Pop Culture, on seeing his thriller plots come true, and how he celebrates the art world via superspy Gabriel Allon.


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If you'd like to share your book reviews, you may link to your website, blog, Goodreads, Google+, Tumblers, or Instagram page. If you do not have any internet or social media account, please leave a comment to let us know what you are reading. Please do not add links of 52 Books, nonexistent or old web pages. They will be deleted. If your link disappears, please email me if you need to change or update your links. The link widget closes at the end of each book week.

In the Your Name field, type in your name and the name of the book in parenthesis. In the Your URL field paste a link to your post, then check the privacy box and click enter.