Sunday, October 13, 2013

BW42: More Book News



Since we are trekking through Asia and having a spooktacular reading month,  I thought it would be interesting to see what interesting spooky or paranormal books are available.  


Japanese Ghost Stories

Synopsis:  Japanese Ghost Stories is a collection of the eerie and terrifying from around Japan. This book opens a window into the hidden aspects of the Japanese world of the paranormal, a place where trees grow human hair, rocks weep and there's even a graveyard where Jesus is reputed to have been buried. Covering ancient and modern times, Japanese Ghost Stories offers not only good, old-fashioned scary stories, but some special insights into Japanese culture and psychology.



Synopsis:   Forget Godzilla. Forget the giant beasties karate-chopped into oblivion by endless incarnations of Ultraman, Kamen Rider, and the Power Rangers. Forget Sadako from 'The Ring' and that creepy all-white kid from 'The Grudge.' Forget everything you know about tales of terror before reaching for this book.

Yokai Attack! is a nightmare-inducing one-stop guide to Japan's traditional creepy-crawlies. Yokai are ethereal sorts of beings, like ghosts, nearly always encountered at night; everyone has their own take on how they might look in real life and what sorts of specific characteristics and abilities they might have


 


Synopsis:  Eminent Chinese scholar John Minford's superb translation captures the consummate skill and understated humor of Pu Songling's classic Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio. With elegant prose, witty wordplay, and subtle charm, the 104 stories in this collection reveal a world in which nothing is as it seems. In his tales of shape-shifting spirits, bizarre phenomena, haunted buildings, and enchanted objects, Pu Songling pushes the boundaries of human experience and enlightens as he entertains.




Synopsis:  'The Disappearance of Tejas Sharma…and other hauntings’ is an anthology of 12 ghost stories mostly set in India, and is meant for an audience with a penchant for the supernatural. Even with the constraints of a short story, each tale is rich in details and these dozen stories cover all the time tested classical elements of supernatural fiction. From the story of the young man who inexplicably vanishes to the epic tale of the haunted Peepal tree in Rajasthan; from the true story of a ghost station in West Bengal to the medieval legend of the scary well on a remote island; from the mysterious tick and cross markings in a graveyard to the haunting music coming from a locked room…  

More books for your wishlist!

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2 comments:

  1. Never did I think to understand justification and sanctification more deeply while surrounded by a pink motorcycle helmet, a cranky organist, curly-haired Maddox, The Coroner reruns, and grumpy cats! But that's what happened when I read Splitting Harriet.

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  2. As a classical homeschooler, I'm sure you've read Reading with Purpose, but if not, it's absolutely worth it. Thanks for the link up!

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