Sunday, May 22, 2022

BW21: A bit of this, a bit of that!

 


Happy Sunday! I'm in a mood. Can't tell you which one, but a mood. So today, you get a bit of this, a bit of that.  A bit of this from my wild mind as well as a bit of that from the world wide web. 

One of the dusty books in my virtual shelves is A.S. Byatt's The Djinn in the Nightingale’s Eye. It's one of those one day I'll get round to it. Saw George Miller Presents His “Anti-Mad Max” in Three Thousand Years of Longing Trailer on Tor which is based on Byatt's book and is quite intriguing.  Especially since Idris Elba is in it. Yum.  I'll be diving into The Djinn soon. 

I recently got sucked into a Korean drama on Netflix, Romance is a Bonus Book which is set in a publishing company.  It was quite fascinating and wondered if any of the books mentioned were real. Quite pleased to discover they are!  Discovered there are a few K drama's that are based on books

Stumbled across Lessons Learned from a Year Listening to the Fictional Octopus in My Head by Shelby Van Pelt. Reminded me of my very literal minded son when he was young and how I had to rethink each sentence and learn how to talk to him without slang or metaphor. Will definitely be reading Remarkably Bright Creatures this year. 

As we all know, Nora Roberts is one of my favorite authors. Her assistant Laura recently posted her latest Notes from a Cranky Publicist in which she mentioned books she read while recovering from hip surgery.  Besides Nora of course, she listed several great books including other authors I love such as Nalini Singh and Sarah Addison Allen. She talked about some new to me authors and Beach Read by Emily Henry and Every Summer After by Carley Fortune immediately went on my wish list.  My ever growing wish list because my buying ban is still in force.  Maybe I'll break down in June. 

Okay, enough about me.  LOL!  Several interesting things happened in history on May 22.

1819:  The steamship SS Savannah set sail from Savannah, Georgia for Liverpool, England on the first trans Atlantic crossing.  Read a book about a steamship.  

1859: Birth of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle:  Read about the author or read a book about his character, Sherlock Holmes.

1868 - The Great Train Robbery:  Read Michael Crichton's Great Train Robbery, or other fiction and non fiction books about train robberies 

1906 - Patent 821,393 is to Wilbur and Orville Wright for “new and useful improvement in Flying Machines.”    Read a book about how airplanes were invented and/or the Wright Brothers.

1933:  first declared by U.S Congress to be National Maritime Day in honor of the Merchant Marines.  Read a book about marine heritage.

1933 - First reported sighting of the Loch Ness Monster.  We enjoyed reading the book written by Dick King-Smith, The Water Horse as well as watching the Movie.

1967 - The debut of "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood:  We recently enjoyed both the movie and the book tie in A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood  based off of Tom Junod's article about Mr. Rogers for Esquire magazine. It touched our hearts and gave us a new appreciation for Mr. Rogers

1977 - the Orient Express takes it's final trip across Europe.  Read a book about or which takes place on the Orient Express.  Hint, hint - Agatha Christie. 

Have fun following rabbit trails!!!!

And if you are still following along with our letter of the week, we are back on track with the letter U

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Sunday, May 15, 2022

BW20: 52 Books Bingo - Ensemble Cast

Headlines  - Darren Thompson

Happy Sunday! It's time for another round of 52 Books Bingo and this week it's all about Ensemble Casts. My favorite kind of book. I love books with ensemble casts, especially series books because they make it seem like the story goes on and on and on.  There are books in which the cast revolves around one main character and others which rotate through a series of characters, all working together for a common end.  









Do you enjoy reading books with an ensemble cast of characters?  From Agatha Christie and Leo Tolstoy to Robert Jordan's and J.D. Robb, there is a wide variety to choose from.  Who is your favorite author and/or books with an ensemble cast you've read and would recommend?


I just noticed that we have a predicament, a quagmire, a problematic quandary.  Que Pasa!   When I pondered and questioned why my weeks weren't adding up, I realized I missed P and Q in our letter and word of the week.  We missed a pilgrimage, a quest. Oops, my bad. Jumping back on the Quixotic path for a moment.  

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Sunday, May 8, 2022

BW19: Happy Mother's Day

 


Happy Mother's Day my lovelies!  Hope you all are having a marvelous day, celebrating with your families.  We all have colds so I gave my son one task: go to my Amazon wish list, pick something out, make sure it's prime, and will arrive in one day.  Easy Peasy.  I'll let you know what he found for me.  

Read a book with your mother's name in the title or is written by an author with your mother's name

Read a book with mother, mom, mama, mater, or other variation in the title. 

Read a book about a mom.

Read a book about becoming a mother.

From stalkers to saints, moms run the gamut in kids' books.  We read Horton Hatches the Egg and the Runaway Bunny so many times over the years. Another favorite not listed is Lisa McCourt's I love You Stinky Face about unconditional love which we enjoyed reading so much, I had to duct tape the cover together to keep it from falling apart. 

11 Memoirs That Shine the Spotlight on Mothers

The Best Books for Every Type of Mom

Books that keep it real for Mother’s Day

Women's Prize for Literature Shortlist showcases global talent

And for our letter and word of the week - U and unconditional


“When you look into your mother’s eyes, you know that is the 

purest love you can find on this earth.” ~~ Mitch Albom, For One More Day


Happy Mother's Day! 

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Sunday, May 1, 2022

BW18: May Crime Spree - Historical Mysteries

 




Welcome to May! It's time to join Sandy and Amy in reading some tantalizing and tempting historical mysteries. 

The genre of Historical Mysteries is fairly recent with our dear Agatha credited with writing the first historical mystery novel in the 1940s (Death Comes at the End set in Ancient Egypt.) The genre remained stagnant until the 1970s when Elizabeth Peter’s (Amerlia Peabody series) and Ellis Peter’s (Brother Cadfael) cause the genre to become legitimate and then the late 1990’s when it grew wildly.

Common historical mystery era:

Tudor: CJ Sansom (Matthew Shardlake), Fiona Buckley (Ursula Blanchard), Kathy Lynn Emerson (Lady Appleton)

·     Georgian: Anna Lee Huber (Lady Darby)

·     Regency: Kate Moss (Julian Kestrel) & CS Harris (Sebastian St Cyr)

·     Victorian: Tasha Alexander (Lady Emily), Deanna Raybourne (Lady Julia Grey), Christine Trent (Lady of Ashes)

·     WWI: Anna Lee Huber (Verity Kent), Charles Todd (Inspector Ian Rutledge & Bess Crawford)

·     WWII: Jacqueline Winspear (Masie Dobbs)

Challenge: Harken back to a simpler time before we had to worry about DNA evidence or even fingerprints and swipe a historical mystery to read.

Thank you, ladies.  Which brings us to our letter and word of the week - T and Twist 

Have fun diving into these tantalizing mysteries. 

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Sunday, April 24, 2022

BW17: Happy Birthday Larry Niven


 

Happy Sunday! In honor of science fiction author, Larry Niven, who is celebrating his 84th birthday on April 30th, read one of his books.  He's written over 400 stories since he published his first book in 1964, alone and in collaboration with Jerry Pournelle, Steven Barnes, and Gregory Benford.  I discovered Niven back in the 70's and enjoyed reading His Ringworld series, along with many of his other books, including The Mote in God's Eye.  He is currently working with Jerry Pournelle on Burning Mountain, the sequel to Burning City and Burning Tower.

Larry Niven Wiki/fandom

Fifty years of Larry Niven's Ringworld

Amazon’s Ringworld Moves Forward with Game of Thrones Director

21 Books That Changed Science Fiction And Fantasy Forever

The 17 Most Influential Science-Fiction Books of All Time


“They do not use lasers, they do not use radio, they do not use hyperwave. What are they using for communication? Telepathy? Written messages? Big mirrors?"

 "Parrots," Louis suggested. He got up to join them at the door to the control room. "Huge parrots, specially bred for their oversized lungs. They're too big to fly. They just sit on hilltops and scream at each other.”

― Larry Niven, Ringworld


Which brings us to our A to Z and Back again - Our letter and word of the week are S and Space

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Sunday, April 17, 2022

BW16: Renew, Rebirth, Recharge, Restore


"Revel in your freedom. Live wholeheartedly,
laugh loud, love much, spread joy, be truthful,
and give yourself to everything.
You, who are already whole, can lose nothing.
Your ego may fall from time to time,
but you will not. Live big!"  ~~Robert Holden

Happy Easter, my friends. Our letter of the week is R and the word, the theme this week is rebirth, rechargerenewalor restore


“Poetry is the renewal of words, setting them free,
and that’s what a poet is doing:
loosening the words.” ~~Robert Frost

Or how about resurrectionrejoicerenaissance, revival or rejuvenation


“It is not easy to convey a sense of wonder,
let alone resurrection wonder, to another.
It’s the very nature of wonder to catch us off guard,
to circumvent expectations and assumptions.
Wonder can’t be packaged, and it can’t be worked up.
It requires some sense of being there
and some sense of engagement.” ~~Eugene H. Peterson

Let's revel in whatever Re- word you chose this week, because, you guessed it; it's all related to reading or rereading our favorite books. 


“A truly great book should be read in youth,
again in maturity and once more in old age,
as a fine building should be seen by
morning light, at noon and
by moonlight.” ~~ Robertson Davies

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Sunday, April 10, 2022

BW15: 52 Books Bingo - Rebellion

Wild Embers: Poems of Rebellion, Fire and Beauty by Nikita Gill.


Happy Sunday! Years ago when I introduced my son to Star Wars, never did I realize there was a difference between legend, canon and non canon.  Since then, we've watched quite a few you tube vloggers discuss and theorize over the movies, the books and tv shows, even video games and how they contribute to the world of Star Wars, the Force, the battle between good and evil, and the rebellion. Which brings us to our next 52 Books Bingo category: Rebellion.  

As defined by Dictionary.com, it is "open, organized, and armed resistance to one's government or ruler," or "resistance to or defiance of any authority, control, or tradition."  Literary Rebellion comes in many shapes and sizes,  the characters fighting for or against something; refusing to bow to authority, their parents, their friends; questioning, resisting, searching for change.  


Literary Rebellion by twelve Nobel Prize Laureates

11 Women in Classic Novels Who Rebelled Against Their Time Periods

21 YA Books About Rebellion

100 Must Read Books about Revolutions, Rebellions, and Uprisings.

Your guide to books in the 'Star Wars' canon

Dissident Rebel Literature


Who is your favorite rebellious character? 

Which bring me to our Letter and Word of the WeekO and Obstruct


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Sunday, April 3, 2022

BW14: Classic Children's Mysteries


Welcome to April and the beginning of National Poetry Month, National Card and Letter Writing Month, and National Humor Month and this week is National Library Week.  

And thanks to Sandy and Amy, we are also celebrating our childhoods, going back to the books we read when we were young.   Take it away, ladies.


Many of us began our life of crime early by reading under the covers with flashlights and lies of “I’ll read just one more chapter then I’ll go to bed.” If you grew up reading Classic Children’s Mysteries then you’ve like got a rap sheet and a read-list as thick as a Sears catalogue. Who were you solving mysteries with in the lunch room and during geometry class?

 Authors to explore:

  Stratemeyer Syndicate – Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, Tom Swift, Bobbsey Twins

·         Cherry Ames

·         Boxcar Children

·         Trixie Belden

·         Encyclopedia Brown

Challenge: Confess to starting a life of crime young and reread a favorite childhood mystery.


Thank you, ladies for bringing back memories of the past. I read many The Hardy Boys as well as Nancy Drew and Trixie Beldon books back in the day.  Does anyone remember the television show of Hardy Boy/Nancy Drew mysteries from the 70's?  I was infatuated with Shaun Cassidy and Parker Stevenson and wanted to be a detective just like Pamela Sue Martin who portrayed Nancy Drew.  

Which bring me to our Letter and Word of the Week:  N and Noteworthy

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Sunday, March 27, 2022

BW13: Happy Birthday Dana Stabenow

 


“Science fiction is the agent provocateur of literature.” ~ Dana Stabenow

Happy Sunday my dears. During my web wanderings, I found out today, March the 27th is author Dana Stabenow's birthday.  I checked out her blog and read an article about How My Mother and Josephine Tey Led me into a Life of Crime. Given I'd recently read Tey's A Daughter of Time, I was drawn.  I was fascinated by Stabenow's tale of discovering Nancy Drew in the library and the start of her reading journey. Lots of interesting authors, some I've read, some I haven't yet. Stabenow is a prolific writer and has written forty novels during her writing career beginning with a couple of science fiction novels and segueing into writing murder mysteries.  

It just so happens, one of the dusty books on my eshelves is Dana Stabenow's A Cold Day for Murder, book number one in the 22 book Kate Shugak mystery series.  I think I bought back in 2014 around the time I was enamored with freezing cold settings and read Nevada Barr's Winter Study and bought a bunch of other titles with snow in them, some of which I had yet to read.  Somehow I overlooked Stabenow's book so in honor of her birthday, I'll be reading it this week.  And suddenly I'm also in the mood to reread James Rollins Ice Hunt

Learn more about Kate Stabenow from The Thrill Begins: Meet Your Heroes - Dana Stabenow and PBS AK Alaska podcast Dana Stabenow talks about her latest crime novel, her writing career and her support for women writers and what books Stabenow likes to read with Poison Pen's Dana Stabenows Distractions

A to Z and Back again - Our letter and word of the week are M and Murder (Obviously... LOL!)

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Sunday, March 20, 2022

BW12: Spring Fling or Autumn Optimism


 
Today we celebrate the March equinox, welcoming Spring or Autumn, depending on where you are in the world.  Both seasons have something in common - nature's showcase of beautiful colors, bright and bold as well as rich and warm.  So let's dive into the season with our Spring / Autumn Reading Fling. 

  • Read a book with flowers or leaves on the cover.
  • Read a book with the colors of spring or autumn on the cover 
  • Read a book with Spring or Autumn in the title
  • Read a book about a Spring or Autumn Fling. (oh la la)
  • Read a book about life beginning.
  • Read a book about rebirth.
  • Read a book about life changing. 
  • Read a book about wine or with wine on the cover 
  • Read a book with any of the words from the poem below on the cover

 

Spring And Autumn.

By 

Thomas Moore 


Every season hath its pleasures;
Spring may boast her flowery prime,
Yet the vineyard's ruby treasures
Brighten Autumn's soberer time.
So Life's year begins and closes;
Days tho' shortening still can shine;
What tho' youth gave love and roses,
Age still leaves us friends and wine.


Phillis, when she might have caught me,
All the Spring looked coy and shy,
Yet herself in Autumn sought me,
When the flowers were all gone by.
Ah, too late;--she found her lover
Calm and free beneath his vine,
Drinking to the Spring-time over,
In his best autumnal wine.


Thus may we, as years are flying,
To their flight our pleasures suit,
Nor regret the blossoms dying,
While we still may taste the fruit,
Oh, while days like this are ours,
Where's the lip that dares repine?
Spring may take our loves and flowers,
So Autumn leaves us friends and wine.



A to Z and Back again - Our letter and word of the week are L and Life

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Sunday, March 13, 2022

BW11: All the World's a Stage

 


Happy Sunday, my darlings. For those of us who still have to abide by daylight savings time, did you remember to set your clocks forward? I'm appreciating the fact we only have a few clocks to adjust when I think about the clock merchant who has to reset a 1000 clocks.  

Speaking of time, our next 52 Books  Bingo category is All the World's a Stage.  Which works well with our golden age theme since William Shakespeare was alive during the Elizabethan era, considered the Golden Age in English history

There are many ways to go with this category including but not limited to

Five Best William Shakespeare Plays 

Goodreads Top 100 Stage Plays

Goodreads Listopia - Best Books about Stage magic 

17 sparkling and suspenseful novels set on the stage or the screen

A Complete List of Books for Every Stage of Your Life, According to Librarians


“All the world’s a stage”

by

William Shakespeare 

(from As You Like It, spoken by Jaques)

                                        All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lin’d,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well sav’d, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.



A to Z and Back again - Our letter and word of the week are K and Keen

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Sunday, March 6, 2022

BW10: Crime Spree Bookology - Josephine Tey

 


Happy Sunday! Continuing with our Golden Age mystery writers, this month's Crime Spree Bookology choice is Josephine Tey.  I've had The Daughter of Time sitting in my stacks for quite a while and look forward to reading it now.  Tey is the creator of Inspector Alan Grant series and also wrote plays under the pseudonym of Gordon Daviot.

There are a number of ways to complete the Crime Spree bookology challenge, including but not limited to:

Spell out the author's name - one book per letter from the title on the cover.

Read one or more books written by the author.

Read a book written in the country or time period of the author.

Learn more about Josephine Tey through a Crime Readers Guide to the Classics and Decades After Her Death, Mystery Still Surrounds Crime Novelist Josephine Tey.


A to Z and Back again - Our letter and word of the week are J and Justice

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